NEWS

  • A Few Perennial Favourites

    By on July 20, 2017

    Broad beans. This might be an unusual way to start a sentence but I thought I would mention how well my early sowings had done. They have come to an end now but we have enjoyed them. Because they are such mainstays of the vegetable patch and I have been patiently expecting them since they were sown last winter it is like saying goodbye to old friends. I prefer to pick them when the pods are small and the beans only about the size of a 5p coin. They can be used raw as an addition to salads or put straight into a risotto and allowed to cook with the rice. My absolute favourite has to be broad beans liver and bacon with the liver floured, fried gently and only just done. The gravy is to die for though it’s hard to find companions who will eat offal so it is often a solitary pleasure.

    I have heard many tales of woe from growers of runner beans and peas this year who planted and were caught out by a dry spell. I have to confess to a some disappointment myself. A family holiday meant that the pigeons enjoyed the peas before I did and my next batch of peas and beans have needed a lot of water to get away at all.

    I have had more success in the herbaceous border and with my containers. The regale lily bulbs (Lilium regale) have put on a magnificent show. The large trumpet flowers white inside with a yellow throat and a pink back are filling the warm air with scent. It is a thick heavy scent and you feel that you have to wade through it once it has you in its grasp. Of all the bulbs that I take from containers and plant in the garden these lilies are some of the most successful. They like plenty of sun and good drainage. I always put a handful of gravel underneath them when planting. I usually plant in groups digging a hole big enough to lift them straight from the container into the ground without breaking them apart.

    Lilium regale

    Lilium regale

    Another scented favourite are the Philadelphus also called mock orange. They are members of the same family as hydrangea and are really indispensable garden shrubs. They give a good display even on poor or chalky soils. Most have white fragrant flowers borne in June or July. The old flowered wood should be cut out after flowering leaving wood produced this season to take its place. They can become large shrubs over time though if this happens the whole thing can be cut to ground level from where new growth will spring.  The most commonly encountered is Philadelphus coronarius which is a strong upright growing species even in dry ground. The cultivar ‘Virginal’ is still perhaps the best double.

    Philadelphus

    Philadelphus

    Danger does lurk deep within the border in the hooded flowers of monkshood or aconitum. Though highly poisonous they are worth having for bed use as they are so amenable as to soil and aspect. A. x bicolor, A. carmichaelii and A. napellus are all good to have and will spread the flowering season from early summer to Autumn.

    Aconitum vulparia also known as A. lycoctonum is also worth growing. It gets its common name ‘Wolf’s Bane’ because it was used as a poisonous bait for wolves in olden    days. Like its blue relatives it has dark divided green leaves though the hooded flower is white or parchment colour and quite tall.

    From edible beginnings to poisonous ends the garden has everything to offer.

    Ross Underwood

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  • Fun in the Sun

    By on June 19, 2017

    “Our England is a garden” said Rudyard Kipling and there is no greater proof that we are a nation of gardeners than the interest given to the Chelsea Flower Show. This floral spectacle engages visitors and TV viewers the world over. Away from all of the razzmatazz and in the humbler surroundings of our own gardens there is plenty going on for the ambitious gardener to make the most of what the season has to offer.

    It is Iris time in the herbaceous border whether the Irises are tall or short bearded with voluptuous standards and falls that shine like satin they will need a good baking their rhizomes planted shallowly towards the full sun.

    Iris sibirica

    Iris sibirica

    More amenable in good garden soil with some moisture and in shade is Iris sibirica which come in shades of blue, pink, purple and white and grow from between 30cm and 90cm. We have many stands of an excellent blue cultivar which I do not know the name of. But it has been divided successfully over several years in the autumn and Spring and spread around. Usually the centre of the plant becomes congested with most of the growth on the outside. It is easy to chop it up with a spade and discard the parts that are showing less vigour and replant the rest.

    Poppies

    Poppies

    Perennial poppies, Papaver orientalis, are excellent border plants and a good partner for alliums or mingled between late flowerers that are still growing. Poppies have petals which always remind me of slightly ruffled tissue paper. ‘Beauty of Livermere’ has wonderful scarlet petals with a black basal blotch but there are also white, plum and pink cultivars. It is not worth letting them go to seed if you want reliable seedlings as they are easily cross pollinated. They grow from basal foliage and they can become untidy after flowering so cut the whole plant down, leaves and all. It will quickly replace the old leaves with new until the flowers appear next year.

    Whether on walls, in borders or shrubberies, Roses are the quintessential English summer flower.  I love the climbing rose ‘Madame Gregoire Staechelin’ which has stupendous pink blooms that have a subtle sweet pea scent. It is a shame that it only flowers once but if you partner it with a late flowering clematis then you can enjoy two plants in the same space.

    Honeysuckle

    Honeysuckle

    Another excellent climber for a wall or growing into a tree or large shrub are honeysuckles. If left unchecked then they can become rampant though they will respond well to a heavy pruning in winter. If the shrub is large enough then you can happily leave them to their own devices.

    Cornus kousa

    Cornus kousa

    Finally for those with patience and space, then the flowering species of Cornus (flowering Dogwoods) are spectacular. I grow cultivars of Cornus kousa which includes old favourites such as ‘Eddies White Wonder’ as well as the species which is worth growing in its own right. There are another group of hybrids hailing from North America and bred from Cornus florida. Cornus florida likes a long hot summer and can sometimes underperform in our cooler summers. It also has an unfortunate habit of clinging onto its leaves in winter, though if you have a sunny spot, cultivars such as ‘Rainbow’ and ‘Cherokee Princess’ are worth a try.

    The best thing about an English summer is that there is something for everybody. And it’s not over yet!

    Ross Underwood

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  • April in the Garden

    By on April 27, 2017

    We’ve all had a treat this month haven’t we?  The glorious sunshine has been a treat and put me in mind of a few lines of Frost’s which might be relevant to gardeners.

    Why make so much of fragmentary blue 

    In here and there a bird or butterfly,

    Or flower, or wearing-stone, or open eye,

    When heaven presents in sheets the solid hue?

    Since Earth is earth, perhaps, not heaven (as yet)-

    Though some savants make earth include the sky;

    And blue so far above us comes so high,

    It only gives our wish for blue a whet.”

    One of the glories of this time of year is to see early flowers against a clear spring sky, particularly when these flowers are borne at the ends of magnolia branches.

    Magnolia denudata

    Magnolia denudata

    Magnolias are the queens of garden flowers, there is such a variety of form and habit from shrubby types such as M. stellata or its pink form ‘Rosea’ to large trees, amongst the finest of which are the Campbellii species as hybrids such as ‘Darjeeling’ or mollicomata which flowers earlier than most. Typically the magnolias we grow in our gardens are precocious, the flowers appearing before the leaves.   However there is a magnolia for almost every season if you have the site,  soil and situation.  Magnolia grandiflora is an evergreen suitable for growing as a large tree.  Football sized fragrant white flowers are a vision in summer.  As this magnolia comes from the southern U.S.A it is used to higher average summer temperatures and humidity then we get in the U.K so it is better grown against a warm sunny wall, even in full sun.  If you have a north facing wall then a good upright growing variety such as ‘Daybreak’ will prove successful, as the lack of strong sunlight protects the buds from being forced into flower early and thus being damaged by frosts.

     Magnolia M. Daybreak

    Magnolia M. Daybreak

    For fragrance M. ‘Merrill’ which has white flowers and grows 12 or 15 feet high cannot be beaten whilst M. salicifolia has aniseed scented foliage.

    Magnolia M. Merril

    Magnolia M. Merril

    Magnolias come from a wide variety of climates and habitats but those we buy from the nurseries will be grafted onto one rootstock or another to control vigour as well as to induce them to flower earlier.  They are very amenable.

     Most will grow in any reasonable, slightly acidic garden soil but they do demand decent humus and organic content.  Most magnolias are forest plants and so enjoy companionship and the shelter from strong winds provided by other trees.

    Magnolias have a system of shallow feeding roots which, once planted, resent disturbance.  When planting, I don’t even tease roots away from the root-ball as I would do with any other shrub or tree.  Thorough ground preparation with plenty of leaf-mould or soil conditioner is essential and it is important to plant the top of the root-ball level with the surrounding soil.  I have learned to my cost the fatal effects of planting magnolias too deep despite the well intentioned desire to keep as much moisture as possible around a newly planted specimen.

    If Magnolias are the queens of garden flowers then Rhododendrons ( including Azaleas) are the kings.  April and May are the best months to go to gardens boasting collections of rhododendrons and admire their many forms and flower colours.

    Rhododendrons have suffered a fall in popularity over the last few years.  Many people have been of the opinion that this was because they could not be accommodated in smaller gardens, but I rather feel that it was the result of nurseries and garden centres failing to offer a variety of plants.  When many people think of rhododendrons, they often think of R. ponticum or its hybrids, which line the drives of many a stately home and, after flowering, form an unattractive green lump.  When the gardener is looking for a plant that gives interest over more than one season it is understandable that many begrudge giving space to rhododendrons with their short flowering season.  However if we look beyond the common hybrids there is a rhodo out there for everyone.  Many of the species and cultivars have attractive foliage with either silver backed leaves or leaves marbled with brown hairy indumentum as well as attractive bark. Azaleas, members of the rhododendron family, make excellent garden plants.  Many cultivars are deciduous and have the added bonus of scented flowers and autumn colour.  They come in a wide range of colours from the pure white of ‘Persil’ to pinks and the bright yellows of R. luteum.

    We all want our plants to give us value, to perform for as long as possible and with as little demand on our time as possible.  There is nothing wrong with this view; my argument is simply a blend of the practical and philosophical.  Firstly, not every plant is suitable for every garden or situation within a garden so we should all chose plants suitable for what we have, rather than try too hard to change the soil or situation to our advantage.  Secondly, imagine the most beautiful magnolia flower you have ever seen then ask yourself if in fact part of the charm is that very ephemeral nature.  Would you be as excited or notice it as much if it flowered non-stop?

    Finally, my top tip for this time of year is not to cut the foliage of flowering spring bulbs down until they start to die down on their own.  This might not appeal to the tidy minded gardener but these bulbs are entering the most critical stage of their growth when they are making food to support new flowers next spring. Look at your snowdrops. Now they have finished flowering, the leaves have elongated and widened to capture as much light as possible.  If you have daffodils planted in grass leave it alone, don’t mow.  If you don’t like having long grass then you shouldn’t have put the daffodils there in the first place!

    Ross Underwood

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  • Signs of Spring

    By on March 14, 2017

    What a great thing to be able to pause from ones labours and look around at what is happening both in nature and in the garden. Though the weather may be a bit iffy still it is generally getting warmer. In days gone by farmers would proverbially test the soil by sitting on it (trousers down) to see if it was ready for planting. These days such behaviour might raise eyebrows from the neighbours! Though nothing beats being a gardener when the sun is out and you can roll up your shirt sleeves.

    The pace of change is incredible, already there are hosts of pale yellow daffodils like little lanterns throughout the grassy areas. These are the Lenten Lilies otherwise called Narcissus pseudonarcissus. These are native daffodils which are very useful for naturalising. They can often be found under hedges or in ditches where they will tolerate even brackish conditions, a useful addition to the garden armoury. When you are planning your bulb displays these can be supplemented by later varieties.

    Incidentally, it is worth checking your potted bulbs to make sure they are coming up as they should be. Hyacinths, Tulips and Narcissus should all be showing good leaf and the hyacinths should be showing their flower spikes. If you have planted the tops of the pots with spring bedding such as wallflowers or violas make sure that the bulbs are not forcing them out of the compost. Hyacinths will do this especially. If they are, then just nestle then back next to the emerging bulb foliage.

    Showing off amongst the daffodils are the crocus. No flower seems to welcome the sunshine more as the petals close on dull days and open when the sun shines.  Many of the species crocus have a dull colour to the outer surface of the petals which camouflages them from birds. The larger flowers of Dutch varieties are altogether showier but by no means vulgar.

    IMG_2861

    Crocus

    There are many more plants that have waited patiently to take advantage of the spring sunshine before the trees and shrubs get their leaves. Pulmonarias make superb ground cover. The common name of Lungwort refers to the spotted pattern on the leaves which was resembles the tissue of the organ and was believed in times past to cure lung problems.  Breeders have taken advantage of this patterning to produce a range of cultivars such as ‘Opal’ that are as ornamental in leaf as in flower. The flowers come in blue, pink or white and look delightful amongst the leaves beneath trees and shrubs.

    Pulmonaria

    Pulmonaria

    The ‘wood spurge’ (Euphorbia amygdaloides var Robbiae) which is another native has also seized it’s chance. This is an excellent plant for the more difficult areas including dry shade. It has glossy deep green leaves which reflect light in winter about a foot high and bright acid green flowers.  This plant can be a bit of an aggressive spreader but is wonderful for smothering weeds.  It will often spread quickly, sometimes the original plants will run out of steam and die off. This can be turned to an advantage as I often use it to colonise areas of poor drought prone soil. By the time it turns up its toes it has often improved the soil through the combined efforts of its roots and leaves which have shaded the soil and preserved organic matter thus making it a better environment for succession planting.

    Look upward and there are flowers along the branches of early cherries such as Prunus ‘Kursar’ which has single pink flowers that are abundantly strung in clusters along the branches. It is an excellent and showy variety and a taste of things to come, though for now, perhaps just watching the transformation all around us is good enough.

    Prunus Kursar

    Prunus Kursar

    Ross Underwood

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  • After Doris

    By on March 6, 2017

    I recall having a conversation with another gardener earlier this month. We were remarking on how mild the past winter had been. But this was in January and we both agreed that we could not count on a lucky escape as February was still to come. February storms seem to have become a norm and the most recent, Doris, was no exception.

    Snowdrops

    Snowdrops

    The beginning of March brings a kind of cabin fever to gardeners who just want to get out there and get on with a bit of early weeding, soil improvement, seed sowing or the multitude of other tasks which are needed. One task that I try never to neglect at this time is to re-pot containerised shrubs which live year round in their container. If they become too congested then it is easy for potted shrubs to languish and fade. Shrubs such as camellias should be lifted and handled carefully so as not to damage the buds that they are carrying.

    Try to tease out the more fibrous roots and knock off as much old compost as possible. You can use secateurs to prune away some of the thickest and most woody ones so as to leave room for the thinner feeding roots that will regrow in the pot. When you put it back in its home make sure that you water the new compost in so that it settles around the root ball without leaving any air gaps that could lead to the plant drying out. Protect the new plants from getting blown over by the wind before they have gotten a secure purchase in their new home.

    Daffodils

    Daffodils

    Sometimes it is no good, we get beaten by the weather whatever our intentions. That is when it is nice to do two things. The first is to settle down with some good gardening books. I have read three recently that have kept my attention and that I would recommend to you.

    The first is by Michael and Anne Haseltine (yes THAT Michael Haseltine) and is entitled ‘Thenford’ after the garden that he and his wife have created. It is a large coffee table sized book, certainly not one to carry around. However, it is worth sitting down with as the writing is really very good and the images are excellent. It is always nice to peer into the gardens of the great and the good to see what they have got that we can’t have in our own garden and there is always a vicarious thrill for good gardeners in seeing something grown well.

    My next recommendations cross the Atlantic to the USA which is home to some excellent gardens and in which Chanticleer is amongst the most renowned. I first read about it elsewhere but a recent book about it was on my Christmas list. The book is rather pretentiously titled ‘The Art of Gardening’ but as you read on it seems not far from the truth as the gardeners at Chanticleer use plants as set designers do on stage to conjure magical effects.

    Finally, my last choice for a wet weather read is titled ‘The New York Botanical Garden’ and is a celebration of that institution and a history of the rise and fall of its fortunes until the present day. Since Frederick Law Olmstead designed Central Park and more recently with the creation of the High Line, New York has been an inspirational city in the creation of public green spaces though the Botanical Garden has been comparatively overlooked. Perhaps this book will put right that omission? It is worth a read in any case.

    My final tip for a windy or wet evening is to seek out your local gardening club or horticultural society. Many hold excellent winter lectures by local or visiting gardeners though a good many have suffered a decline in membership and you might be just what they are looking for! Who knows you could swap a few gardening books around.

    Cheer up its almost looking like spring out there!

    Ross Underwood

     

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